University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh Law Review

Challenging Authority: A Symposium in Honor of Derrick Bell

A celebration of the late Derrick Bell (LLB ’57), esteemed Pitt Law alumnus, professor, and one of the founders of critical race theory.
March 27, 2014 - 2:30pm
March 27, 2014 - 6:00pm9:00pm
March 28, 2014 - 8:00am5:00pm
University of Pittsburgh

March 27th:  Reception and Opening Lecture by Professor Ian Haney Lopez, University of California, Berkeley
Located at University of Pittsburgh School of Law

A reception will take place at 6:00pm the evening of March 27 at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, with opening lecture given by Ian Haney Lopez, the John H. Boalt Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley.

A roundtable discussion will begin at 2:30 in Alcoa Room.

March 28th:  Panel Discussions
Located at University of Pittsburgh's University Club

Panel discussions will take place the following day at the University Club, with a luncheon keynote address given by Richard Delgado, the John J. Sparkman Chair of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law.  The closing keynote address will be given by the University of California School of Law  Kimberlé Crenshaw, Distinguished Professor of Law, Devon Carbado, the Honorable Harry Pregerson Professor of Law, and Cheryl Harris, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

Review the agenda here.

 

 

Keynote Speakers

Opening Lecture on March 27, 2014

Ian Haney López
John H. Boalt Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley

Ian Haney López is one of the nation's leading thinkers on how racism has evolved in the United States since the civil rights era. He is the author of three books and his writings have appeared across a range of sources, from the Yale Law Journal to the New York Times.

The John H. Boalt Professor of Law at the University of California, Berkeley, Haney López has been a visiting law professor at Yale, New York University, and Harvard, where he also served as the Ralph E. Shikes Visiting Fellow in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. He holds a master's in history from Washington University, a master's in public policy from Princeton, and a law degree from Harvard. In 2011, Haney López received an Alphonse Fletcher Fellowship, awarded to scholars whose work furthers the integration goals of Brown v. Board of Education.

Afternoon Keynote Address on March 28, 2014

Richard Delgado

Richard Delgado
John J. Sparkman Chair of Law
University of Alabama School of Law

Professor Delgado is the John J. Sparkman Chair of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law. He received his A.B. from the University of Washington and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was Notes and Comments Editor for the California Law Review. Before coming to Alabama in 2013, he taught at the University of Pittsburgh, Colorado, and UCLA. Professor Delgado and Derrick Bell were colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh from 2006-2008.

Author of over one hundred journal articles and twenty books, Delgado’s work has been praised or reviewed in The Nation, The New Republic, the New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal. His books have won eight national book prizes, including six Gustavus Myers awards for outstanding book on human rights in North America, the American Library Association’s Outstanding Academic Book, and a Pulitzer Prize nomination. With his wife, Professor Jean Stefancic, Delgado co-edited The Derrick Bell Reader. Professor Delgado’s teaching and writing focus on race, racism, and the law.

Closing Keynote Address on March 28, 2014

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw
Distinguished Professor of Law
UCLA School of Law

Professor Crenshaw (Faculty Director 2009 - 2011), was elected Professor of the Year in 1991 and 1994, is recognized as one of the founders of Critical Race Theory, the body of legal scholarship on race that has had enormous influence within and outside the legal academy. An editor of Critical Race Theory: Key Writings That Formed the Movement (1995), she has been the author of many such writings, including Race, Reform, and Retrenchment, published in the Harvard Law Review (1988). She teaches Civil Rights, Critical Race Theory, and advanced seminars in Advanced Critical Race Theory, “Race, Law, and Representation,” “Race, Surveillance, and Punishment,” and “Intersectionality.”

Devon Carbado

Devon Carbado
Honorable Harry Pregerson Professor of Law
UCLA School of Law

Professor Carbado, (CRS Faculty Director 2003-2004) has been elected Professor of the Year twice, received the Rutter Award for Teaching Excellence, and in 2007 was bestowed with the University Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest attainment of academic and professional excellence in the UC system. He is the editor of Black Men on Race, Gender and Sexuality (1999) and his current research includes a book manuscript on employment discrimination entitled Acting White. His scholarship appears in law reviews at Yale, Cornell, and Michigan, among other places. In the CRS Curriculum, he teaches Critical Race Theory, Constitutional Criminal Procedure, and advanced seminars in Critical Race Theory, as well as teaching Constitutional Law.

Cheryl Harris

Cheryl Harris
Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Professor in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
UCLA School of Law

Professor Harris is the author of the enormously influential article "Whiteness as Property", published in the Harvard Law Review (1993). A nationally-recognized expert in race theory and anti-discrimination law, she teaches Critical Race Theory, Civil Rights, Employment Discrimination and a seminar on Race-Conscious Remedies in the CRS curriculum, as well as teaching Constitutional Law. In 2005, she was awarded the Distinguished Professor Award by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California.

Other Speakers

Alfred Brophy
Professor Brophy is a Judge John J. Parker Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School of Law. He received his A.B., summa cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania, his J.D. from Columbia University, where he served as an editor of the Columbia Law Review. Professor Brophy also has an A.M. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Prior to teaching, Professor Brophy clerked for Judge John Butzner of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, practiced with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in New York, and was a Mellon Fellow in Humanities at Harvard University. Before joining the faculty at the University of North Carolina School of Law, he taught at Boston College, the University of Hawaii, and Vanderbilt University.

Professor Brophy has written extensively on race and property law in colonial, antebellum, and early Twentieth Century America. His books include: Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Riot of 1921, Race, Reparations, Reconciliation and Reparations Pro and Con. He is also the leading co-author of Integrating Spaces: Property Law and Race. Professor Brophy is currently completing a book on antebellum jurisprudence, tentatively titled, University, Court, and Slave, which will be published in 2014 by Oxford University Press. 

Montré D. Carodine
Professor Carodine currently teaches Critical Race Theory, Evidence, Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Complex Litigation, and International Civil Litigation at the University of Alabama School of Law. She previously clerked for the Honorable Carl E. Stewart of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, practiced as a litigation associate with Fulbright & Jaworski in Houston, Texas, and taught at Washington and Lee University School of Law. She earned her B.A., summa cum laude, from Louisiana Tech University and her J.D., cum laude, from Tulane. She has been named in the “Top 50 Under 50” List of Most Influential Minority Law Professors by the online journal, Lawyers of Color.

Pat Chew
Professor Chew is the Salmon Chaired Professor and Distinguished Faculty Scholar at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. Professor Chew received a J.D. and M.Ed from the University of Texas, and she received an A.B. in psychology from Stanford University. Prior to teaching, Professor Chew practiced corporate and international law. Professor Chew has taken on numerous leadership roles through her career, including serving as Chair of the American Association of Law Schools Section on Women in Legal Education and serving as a Council member of the General Practice Division of the ABA. Professor Chew was honored with the Keith Aoki Excellence in Asian American Jurisprudence Award in 2011. 

Paul Finkelman
Paul Finkelman is the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center at Albany Law School. He is a renowned legal historian and expert in constitutional history, constitutional law, freedom of religion, the law of slavery, civil liberties and the American Civil War. A distinguished writer, Professor Finkelman is the author of more than 150 scholarly articles and more than 30 books, and has written extensively on Thomas Jefferson and on Abraham Lincoln. He received his B.A. from Syracuse University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in American History from the University of Chicago. 

Stacey Gahagan
Ms. Gahagan is a 2012 graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Law, where she was Editor-in-Chief of the North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation. Currently, Ms. Gahagan is an associate attorney at Schwartz & Shaw P.L.L.C. in Raleigh, NC.

Juan Perea
Professor Perea currently teaches at Loyola University Chicago School of Law, where he focuses on the areas of race and race relations, constitutional law, employment law, and professional responsibility. Professor Perea has written extensively on racial inequality, immigration history, and the civil rights of Latinos in the United States. His works have appeared in the Michigan Law Review, Virginia Journal of Social Policy & Law, and Ohio State Law Journal. Professor Perea received a B.A. from Boston College and a J.D. from the University of Maryland.

SpearIt
SpearIt is a professor at Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University. He has written extensively in the areas of criminal justice and critical race theory. SpearIt attained his J.D. from the University of California Berkeley and also has a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from University of California Santa Barbara. His scholarship focuses on issues in sentencing, corrections, and prisons, often viewed through the lenses of religion, race, and gender. SpearIt has training in seven languages, including Hindi, Panjabi, and Sanskrit. He previously taught inmates as part of the Patten University’s Prison University Project and is an active researcher for the Institute for Social Policy & Understanding.

Jean Stefancic
Jean Stefancic is Professor and Clement Research Affiliate at the University of Alabama School of Law.  Her writing, which focuses on law reform, social change, and legal scholarship, includes over forty articles and twelve books, some co-authored with Richard Delgado, with whom she has shared writing residencies at Bellagio, Bogliasco, and Centrum. She and Professor Delgado also co-edited The Derrick Bell Reader.

Before coming to Alabama in 2013 from Seattle University School of Law, Professor Stefancic taught at the University of Pittsburgh, where she was Research Professor & Derrick Bell Scholar.  During her ten years at the University of Colorado Law School, she was affiliated with the Latino/a Research & Policy Center and on the advisory committee of the Center of the American West. She co-teaches race, racism and the law with Professor Delgado. 

George Taylor
Professor Taylor studies the role that religion plays in contemporary American law and politics, as well as the methods by which judges and lawyers interpret statutory and constitutional law. Some of his more recent work includes applying theological vocabulary to help frame the work of critical race scholar Derrick Bell. Through his teaching, Professor Taylor helps students explore these topics in his Race, Religion, and the Law Seminar, originally co-taught with Derrick Bell. His writings on race and the law have appeared in the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, University of Maryland Journal of Race, Religion, Gender, and Class, and New York University Review of Law & Social Change. Professor Taylor received a B.A. with honors from Brown University, an M.A. in Ethics and Society from University of Chicago, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Thursday 2:30-5:30 Roundtable Session Speakers

Kristina Campbell, University of D.C. David A Clarke School of Law
Tanya Asim Cooper, University of Alabama School of Law
Timothy Golden, West Chester University, Department of Philosophy
Justin Hansford, St. Louis University School of Law
Marissa Jackson, Law Clerk to Hon. Damon J. Keith, U.S. Court of Appeals (6th Cir.)
Melinda Molina, Capital University Law School
William Rhee, West Virginia University College of Law
Josephine Ross, Howard University School of Law
Rakhi Ruparelia, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law
Andre Smith, Widener Law

Co-sponsored by:

This event is co-sponsored by the Center on Race & Social Problem at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, ACLU of Pennsylvania and Greater Pittsburgh, Community Empowerment Association, and Black Law Students Association at Pitt Law.

ACLU PA

Community Empowerment Association

CLE Information

Cost for CLE Credit: $30 per credit hour or $110 for the entire program of 11 credits
Preregistration for CLE Credit is not required.

This program has been approved by the Pennsylvania Continuing Legal Education Board for (11) hours of substantive credit. There is a fee for processing CLE credit for this event.

 

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