University of Pittsburgh

Faculty News

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 12:08pm

Professor David Harris discussed U.S. Department of Justice allegations of racial profiling by the New Orleans’ Police Department, which is itself majority black.  In an interview with Congressional Quarterly’s Justice blog, Professor Harris explained that racial profiling is not, first and foremost, a problem of racial bigotry.  Rather, it is a question of the police department’s culture, training, and customs.  All officers in the department, black and white, work within the same institutional influences.  If the department’s culture and approach encourage profiling of blacks, all officers will engage in it as the standard behavior.  “Black officers are going to be trained like all the others,” Professor Harris explained. “They’re going to want to fit in just like all the others.”

Link

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 12:06pm

From March 4 through March 9, Professor Ronald Brand was in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, where he worked with Pitt Law students Kristine Long (J.D. ‘11) and Richard Kyle (J.D. ‘11) to assist the Vis International Arbitration Moot teams of Qatar University and UAE University in their preparations for oral argument at the competition to be held in Vienna in April.  The training sessions were funded by the Commercial Law Development Program of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 12:05pm

Professor Haider Ala Hamoudi delivered a talk on March 22 to to students at Widener University School of Law (on its Harrisburg, PA, campus) on the legality and legitimacy challenges that faced the Iraqi constitution at its inception, and the means by which Iraqis have attempted to meet and overcome those challenges.

Link

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 11:59am

On Monday, March 21, 2011, Professor Deborah Brake gave a talk at the University of Connecticut in Hartford, Connecticut.  The talk was sponsored by the University’s Women’s Center and was based on her book, “Getting in the Game: Title IX and the Women’s Sports Revolution.”

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 11:13am

Professor Jules Lobel discussed the right of canvassers to knock on doors in residential neighborhoods, even after dark, despite the misgivings of the authorities in some Pittsburgh-area municipalities.  Professor Lobel told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that the right to reach residents by canvassing is protected by the First Amendment, which prevents municipalities from passing broad limits on door-to-door solicitation.

Link

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 11:12am

Professor Jules Lobel discussed the right of canvassers to knock on doors in residential neighborhoods, even after dark, despite the misgivings of the authorities in some Pittsburgh-area municipalities.  Professor Lobel told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that the right to reach residents by canvassing is protected by the First Amendment, which prevents municipalities from passing broad limits on door-to-door solicitation.

Link

Monday, March 21, 2011 - 12:11pm

On March 10, 2011 Professor Peter Oh presented his latest paper, “Veil-Piercing Unbound,” in London at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, sponsored by Queen Mary University of London School of Law.  The lecture was attended by prominent academics, doctoral students, and members of the public.

Monday, March 21, 2011 - 12:10pm

On March 17, 2011, Professor Deborah Brake was a featured speaker at the Sixth Annual Audrey-Beth Finch Women’s Studies Conference, “Leveling the Playing Field: Examining Gender, Social Justice and Sports,” held at California University of Pennsylvania.  Professor Brake’s speech was based on her book, “Getting in the Game: Title IX and the Women’s Sports Revolution.”

Monday, March 21, 2011 - 12:09pm

Professor Jesse Allen’s blog “Blackstone Weekly,” which discusses Blackstone’s Commentaries, will be featured weekly on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s new legal blog, Ipso Facto.  Every Thursday, the Post-Gazette will do a post inviting people to read their way through Professor Allen’s views on the Commentaries.  Ipso Facto also features links to Pitt Law Faculty Blog stories, Jurist, and other news items.

Link to the inaugural post

Wednesday, March 16, 2011 - 8:46pm

Professor Bernard Hibbitts gave a talk entitled “Who Do You Think You Are? Military Lawyers in Historical Perspective” at the 2011 Judicial Conference of the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces in Washington, DC on March 9. The talk explored the records of eight notable military lawyers: William Tudor (the legal advisor to General Washington during the Revolution, and the first US Judge Advocate), Norton Parker Chipman (prosecutor in the Andersonville war crimes trial, held after the Civil War), William Winthrop (author of the first US treatise on military law), Samuel Ansell (reformer of the court-martial system after World War I), Thomas Green (administrator of martial law in Hawaii during World War II), Phyllis Propp-Fowle (the WAC who became the first female Judge Advocate), Charles Kades (primary military drafter of the post-war Japanese constitution during the MacArthur occupation) and Ben Bruce Blakeney (military defense counsel for accused Japanese war criminals at the 1946-48 Tokyo Tribunal). Other speakers at the conference included the Vice Chief of Staff of the US Army, the Canadian Judge Advocate General, and law professors from NYU and Ohio State. Link
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