U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Cites Dean William M. Carter, Jr.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit recently cited Dean William M. Carter, Jr.'s article, "Race, Rights, and the Thirteenth Amendment," with regard to principles of constitutional interpretation. The case noted:

“To determine the commonly understood meaning of the phrase “criminal case” at the time of ratification (1791), we examine dictionary definitions from the Founding era. See Gregory E. Maggs, A Concise Guide to Using Dictionaries from the Founding Era to Determine the Original Meaning of the Constitution, 82 Geo. Wash. L. Rev. 358, 365 (2014); see also William M. Carter, Jr., Race, Rights, and the Thirteenth Amendment: Defining the Badges and Incidents of Slavery, 40 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1311, 1338 n.99 (2007) (stating that contemporaneous dictionaries “obviously . . . provide some guidance to the commonly understood meaning of a particular word at the time that word was used in the constitutional text”).”

Read more in Vogt v. City of Hays from the Tenth Circuit (PDF Download).

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