University of Pittsburgh

Privacy of Student Records (Buckley Amendment)

On November 19, 1974, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (commonly referred to as the Buckley Amendment), which was enacted as part of the Educational Amendments Act (P.L. 93-380), took effect. The stated purpose of the Buckley Amendment is the protection of the educational interest, rights of privacy and confidentiality of students and their parents. As applied to law schools and other post-secondary educational institutions, it is normally the rights of the students that are protected.

The School of Law policy has always been to release personal or academic information only upon request by the student or graduate.

Federal law prohibits the release of any information by the Law School concerning a student unless notice of the intent to release such information is first given to the student. It is the policy of the Law School to release only the following information regarding students: (1) the student's name; (2) address; (3) date and the place of birth; (4) participation in officially recognized activities; (5) dates of attendance; (6) degrees and awards received; and (5) the most recent previous educational institution attended by the student.

Should any student desire that this information not be released, a written request should be made by the student and filed with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

The Registrar, from time to time, receives requests for scholastic information. The Registrar will not release such information until the student has supplied a letter in writing authorizing the Registrar to release the information.

Revised 09/28/2011 | Copyright 2011 | Site by UMC